likeynolikey:

Lauren Bacall: Appreciation for a LIKEon.
No Likey: All 16 Hollywood icons named in Madonna’s Vogue are now gone.
likeynolikey:

Lauren Bacall: Appreciation for a LIKEon.
No Likey: All 16 Hollywood icons named in Madonna’s Vogue are now gone.
likeynolikey:

Lauren Bacall: Appreciation for a LIKEon.
No Likey: All 16 Hollywood icons named in Madonna’s Vogue are now gone.
likeynolikey:

Lauren Bacall: Appreciation for a LIKEon.
No Likey: All 16 Hollywood icons named in Madonna’s Vogue are now gone.

New Orleans socialite Mickey Easterlingtook in [her wake] from her perch on a wrought iron bench, her famous accouterments of hat, feather boa and cigarette holder all in evidence. She even wore a diamond-studded ‘Bitch’ pin on her chest.”

Full story (New Orleans Advocate)

From "On Doris Lessing and Not Saying Thank You" from The New Yorker:

Winning the Nobel Prize was not the most important moment of Doris Lessing’s extraordinary and prolific life, and it seems as though some of her critics won’t forgive her for not pretending that it was, just as they won’t forgive her for leaving her two young children in the care of their father, in Rhodesia, so that she could pursue a different kind of life. Her obituary in the New York Times has a tone of peevish, gawking reproach. (Much better to read Margaret Atwood’s wonderful tribute in the Guardian.) These are many of the same people who pick at Lessing for refusing to call her best-known work, “The Golden Notebook,” a feminist book. But the uncompromising and unapologetic way in which she conducted both her private life and her writing life should speak for itself.

Doris Lessing, Oct. 22, 1919-Nov. 17, 2013

Lou Reed, March 2, 1942-October 27, 2013

From The Baltimore Sun:
Jean E. Hill, a Baltimore model and actress who later performed in three John Waters films, died [August 21, 2013] of renal failure … She was 67.
"She had a personality almost too large for show business, and she startled closed-minded people in every level of society. Sometimes raunchy in her public life, Jean was always classy in her private one, and underneath it all was a real lady," [Waters] said.
"She was a tremendous human being. She was a woman who was very giving and generous and took in many foster kids during her life," said Aileen Johnson, a Washington writer and lawyer.
"She was also very much a woman of the world who could talk to anyone. She had friends in both high and low places, and did not suffer fools gladly," she said.
"I remember the time Jean told Kate Moss that she had been a model, too, and Kate got a big kick out of that," said Mr. Waters.
Read More

From The Baltimore Sun:

Jean E. Hill, a Baltimore model and actress who later performed in three John Waters films, died [August 21, 2013] of renal failure … She was 67.

"She had a personality almost too large for show business, and she startled closed-minded people in every level of society. Sometimes raunchy in her public life, Jean was always classy in her private one, and underneath it all was a real lady," [Waters] said.

"She was a tremendous human being. She was a woman who was very giving and generous and took in many foster kids during her life," said Aileen Johnson, a Washington writer and lawyer.

"She was also very much a woman of the world who could talk to anyone. She had friends in both high and low places, and did not suffer fools gladly," she said.

"I remember the time Jean told Kate Moss that she had been a model, too, and Kate got a big kick out of that," said Mr. Waters.

Read More

Elmore Leonard, What a Guy!

Says Jackie Collins: RIP Elmore Leonard. What a guy – what a teller of wild and wonderful and, most of all, raunchy tales. A storyteller with a crazy imagination mixed in with personal experiences. Many have tried, but nobody has managed to outdo crime fiction’s master of the thriller.

(More)

Karen Black, Versatile Character Actress, Dies at 74

Karen Black, an actress whose roles in several signature films of the late 1960s and ’70s included a prostitute who shared an LSD trip with the bikers played by Dennis Hopper and Peter Fonda in Easy Rider and a waitress unhappily devoted to the alienated musician played by Jack Nicholson in Five Easy Pieces, died on [August 8, 2013] in Los Angeles. She was 74.

“She could be a Mount Holyoke senior intent on saving the whooping crane,” Tom Burke wrote in The New York Times in 1970, describing his first impression of her at her home in Hollywood. “What she really is, of course, is a splendid actress who literally turned herself into the tough, acid-tripping New Orleans whore of ‘Easy Rider,’ and then became Rayette Dipesto, the loving, mediocre and totally unforgettable waitress of ‘Five Easy Pieces,’ and if she is not those characters, not super-hip, neither is she just what she appears to be, waiting on this sunny terrace like a ripening apple. Oh, she is warm, accessible; she is also shrewd, worldly, changeable, a subtle comic, and something of a freak, a beautiful freak.”

(Source: The New York Times)

Bert Stern, an elite commercial photographer who helped redefine advertising and fashion art in the 1950s and ’60s but is perhaps best known for his painfully raw and poignant photos of Marilyn Monroe, taken for Vogue six weeks before her death, died on Tuesday at his home in Manhattan. He was 83. (Full NYT Obituary) Bert Stern, an elite commercial photographer who helped redefine advertising and fashion art in the 1950s and ’60s but is perhaps best known for his painfully raw and poignant photos of Marilyn Monroe, taken for Vogue six weeks before her death, died on Tuesday at his home in Manhattan. He was 83. (Full NYT Obituary)

Bert Stern, an elite commercial photographer who helped redefine advertising and fashion art in the 1950s and ’60s but is perhaps best known for his painfully raw and poignant photos of Marilyn Monroe, taken for Vogue six weeks before her death, died on Tuesday at his home in Manhattan. He was 83. (Full NYT Obituary)

(via likeynolikey)

Taylor Mead, Bohemian and Actor, Dies at 88

Mr. Mead was the quintessential Downtown figure. He read his poems in a Bowery bar, walked as many as 80 blocks a day and fed stray cats in a cemetery, usually after midnight. His last years were consumed by a classic Gotham battle against a landlord, which ended in his agreeing to leave his tenement apartment in return for money. At his death, he had been intending to return to New York after visiting a niece in Colorado.

It was as an actor in what was called the New American Cinema in the 1960s that he made his biggest mark. Warhol recruited him as one of his first “superstars,” and from 1963 to 1968 he made 11 films with Mr. Mead. In all, Mr. Mead figured that he had made about 130 movies, many of them so spontaneous that they involved only one take.

(Source: NY Times)